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Community Alliance for a Safer Tomorrow (CAST) is a risk and protective factor focused approach to reducing problem behaviors in youth through community mobilization, awareness, and planning.  Risk factors are those conditions that increase the likelihood that a child will develop one or more behavior problems during their developmental years.  These risk factors increase the risk of children in our community using drugs and alcohol.  Protective factors are strengths in our community that protect children from alcohol and drug usage.  CAST identifies risk and protective factors from the information received from the Pennsylvania Youth Survey, which is administered every two years to students in grades 6, 8, 10, and 12.  Using the survey results, CAST focuses its efforts on decreasing these risk factors and increasing the protective factors that already exist.

The risk factors identified from the 2011 PAYS are:
1. Peer Rewards for Anti-Social Behavior
2. Depression Factors
3. Student Perceived Low Risk of Harm

Click here to see Risk Factors from previous years.

The protective factors identified from the 2011 PAYS are:
1. Strong Family Attachment
2. Family Rewards for Pro-Social Behavior
3. School Opportunities for Pro-Social Involvement
4. School Rewards for Pro-Social Involvement

To see statistics and results from the 2011 PAYS survey, click here.

To see statistics and results from previous surveys, click here.

 

 

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© 2017
This website was developed,  in part, under a grant number SP 14395-07 from the Office of National Drug Control Policy and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The views, policies, and opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of ONDCP, SAMHSA or HHS.